Building 51 | Building 51 | c. 1908 avery coonley living room leaded art glass door panes removed in or around 1911- linden art glass company, chicago, il.
8069
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c. 1908 avery coonley living room leaded art glass door panes removed in or around 1911- linden art glass company, chicago, il.

51-20387-14

Category

Frank Lloyd Wright

About This Item

two matching original and intact museum quality early 20th century avery coonley (riverside, il.) interior living room leaded art glass door panes or insets executed by the linden glass company, chicago, il. the art glass doors were believed to be removed by frank lloyd wright in the 1911 remodeling of the home’s garden facade. the two doors containing the art glass window panes originally flanked a projecting bay of windows. during the remodel, wright replaced the doors with windows and filled the central bay with doors to allow easier access to the terrace. the well-proportioned geometric design is an extension of an existing pattern found in the living room windows, but on a much larger scale. the copper-plated zinc caming is original and structurally sound. the coonley house estate, consisting of multiple buildings, was constructed between 1907-08 on the banks of the des plaines river in riverside, il. avery coonley was heir to an industrial fortune and had an unlimited budget. the coonley family had investigated wright’s other homes and told him that they saw in his work “the countenances of principle.” wright stated in his autobiography that “this was to me a great and sincere compliment. so i put my best into the coonley house.” the extant house contains a stucco exterior that rises to an upper ceramic tile banding with a geometric pattern. the gardens contain terraces, shallow planters and a large reflecting pool. for the education of the coonley’s young daughter, wright designed a playhouse nearby. around 1960, the main house was divided into two separate residences, now with separate addresses. it was declared a national historic landmark in 1970. the other set of doors remain “in siti” at the coonley residence. measures 70 x 40 inches.