Building 51 | Building 51 | early 20th century speckled glass v-shaped terra cotta panel attributed to architect william l. steele – attributed to william l. steele, architect
8528
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early 20th century speckled glass v-shaped terra cotta panel attributed to architect william l. steele – attributed to william l. steele, architect

51-20880-14

Category

Chicago Buildings

About This Item

unusual original and intact single-sided exterior building facade speckle glazed terra cotta panel salvaged from a building attributed to architect william l. steel. the distinctive v-shaped design (reminiscent of elmslie’s work) is centrally located with floral motifs and berried around the edges. the panel’s rear cavities or webbing have been removed to make the prairie school style terra cotta fragment more displayable with substantially reduced weight. the fabricator was likely midland or the american terra cotta company of chicago. only one available. william labarthe steele was an important architect of the prairie school during the early twentieth century. a graduate of the university of illinois, steele worked in the office of renowned architect louis sullivan. he settled in sioux city, iowa in 1904 and did most of his work there, later moving to omaha, nebraska in 1929. over his career he designed over 250 built commercial buildings, churches, synagogues, homes, schools, and government buildings in iowa, nebraska, south dakota, and minnesota. the woodbury county courthouse in sioux city, iowa is considered his masterpiece, and is arguably the premier example of prairie school aesthetics in the context of a public space. he collaborated with minneapolis architects george grant elmslie, who was the principal designer, and william gray purcell. like steele, purcell had worked briefly for louis sullivan, but elmslie had been sullivan’s chief assistant after sullivan dismissed frank lloyd wright in 1893 until elmslie departed in 1909 to join purcell & elmslie. – See more at: http://www.urbanremainschicago.com/products/museum-quality-artifacts/historically-important-original-early-20th-century-speckled-glass-v-shaped-terra-cotta-panel-attributed-to-architect-william-l-steele.html#sthash.bFZHdRGD.dpuf