Building 51 | Building 51 | exceptional late 1920’s american ornamental cast iron neoclassical style historic sheridan theater lobby staircase baluster panel – j.e.o. pridmore, architect
9269
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exceptional late 1920’s american ornamental cast iron neoclassical style historic sheridan theater lobby staircase baluster panel – j.e.o. pridmore, architect

51-14869-12

Category

Chicago Theatres

About This Item

original c. 1920’s american museum-quality ornamental cast iron classical style interior lobby staircase baluster panel salvaged from the historic sheridan theater (non-extant) located in chicago, il. the double-sided iron panel features a centrally located medallion containing symmetrically arranged scrollwork surrounding a floral rosette flanked by bellflowers. the posts or rods above and below the medallion alternate between unornamented square-shape and a rope twist motif. additional scrollwork and smaller floral rosettes contribute nicely to the assemblage. the exact foundry and/or fabricator is not known. limited quantity available. the sheridan theatre was constructed in 1927 by chicago-based architect j.e.o. pridmore, who later designed the depression era aquatic-themed nortown theater, along with the notable state theater located in minneapolis, mn. the sheridan contained nearly 2600 seats in its balconied auditorium, which featured, like san francisco’s castro, a mock-tented ceiling, ringed by a roman-style ornamental plaster frieze depicting a procession of gods. the auditorium also was equipped with an additional small stage and orchestra pit and organ. unlike pridmore’s other theaters, which were mostly atmospheric in style, the sheridan was a unique neo-classical/italian baroque combination, complete with corinthian columns, roman statuary, and a proscenium arch topped by golden lions supporting a crowned shield. after the sheridan was closed in 1951, it was acquired by a synagogue which used the former theater for their house of worship for the next fifteen years. in the early 1970’s, the sheridan was reopened again for movies in spanish-language, and was renamed the teatro el palacio. it lasted into the early 1990s, when the theater again closed and was ultimately demolished.