Building 51 | Building 51 | stunning c. 1930’s american art deco style ornamental nickel-plated cast bronze general electric buildong elevator call button – john w. cross, cross and cross, architects
9708
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stunning c. 1930’s american art deco style ornamental nickel-plated cast bronze general electric buildong elevator call button – john w. cross, cross and cross, architects

51-19327-14

Category

Non-Chicago Artifacts

About This Item

marvelous early 1930’s american art deco style nickel-plated ornamental cast bronze flush mount “up” and “down” elevator car call push button backplate purportedly salvaged from the historic general electric building in new york city. the single-sided backplate contains a centrally located recessed plate containing the holes where push buttons once existed. the raised border features distinctive sun rays facing inward at each corner. likely fabricated by or for the otis oti elevator company. the general electric building (also known as 570 lexington avenue) is an extant historic 50-floor skyscraper located in new york city, ny. the notable art deco style building was originally known as the rca victor building when designed in 1929-31 by john w. cross of cross and cross. the highly stylized gothic tower clad in multi-colored brick and ornamental terra cotta features elaborate art deco decoration with lightning bolts showing the power of electricity. the base contains impressive masonry, architectural figural sculpture, and on the corner above the main entrance, a conspicuous corner clock with the ge logo and a pair of silver disembodied forearms. the crown of the building is a dynamic-looking burst of gothic tracery, which is supposed to represent electricity and radio waves, and is lit from within at night. the building underwent restoration in 1994-96. measures approximately 6 1/2 x 9 inches.